Quite by chance this week I found myself watching an excerpt from a documentary by the writer and comedienne Ruby Wax. It was made at the turn of the century, and in interviews at their Arkansas HQ key members of the Ku Klux Klan revealed their unfocused prejudices and fears about the rising power of homosexuals in America.

The KKK come across as comic rather than seriously threatening, but what’s shocking is that their confused rhetoric has survived the intervening years almost unchanged in the mouths of present-day US political figures such as Michele Bachmann who accuses the LGBTQ community of intimidation. It’s also alive and well in the slogans and leaflets of Besorgte Eltern NRW (Concerned Parents of North Rhine-Westphalia) who are busily organising marches in German cities like Cologne (there’s another one this weekend) in their campaign to stop children learning about homosexuality at school, and who sadly can’t be dismissed as unwitting clowns or mere echoes from another age, despite the tone of their propaganda.

It’s worth remembering the way many of us in the West reacted when we first saw the video footage from Uganda of preachers showing pornography to their congregations, finding Marin Ssempa’s speeches ridiculous, but with growing concern about how his simplistic misinformed bigotry was gaining hold.

You only had to look at the vile Facebook page of the Uganda Youth Coalition Against Homosexuality (now removed – thankfully – by Facebook following a barrage of complaints) to see how this rabble-rousing has led to the obscene torture and murder of members of the LGBTQ community in Africa .  And it’s worth remembering that the US evangelist widely credited with setting in motion what’s happened in Uganda is Scott Lively, now seeking a new platform in Massachusetts, where he is standing as an independent candidate for election to the post of Governor later this year. He talks openly of a coming anti-gay “revolution” in response to the “homosexual agenda”.

And it’s at this point that the Ruby Wax interviews with the Ku Klux Klan, from another century, suddenly aren’t quite so quaint and amusing.